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Borrowing Options When Moving Abroad

N835NN American Airlines Boeing 737-823 (WL)[This is a guest post by Jan Tabares. Think you’ve got what it takes to be a guest poster? Contact Em at em [at] blondeandbalanced [dot] com to learn more about becoming a guest poster yourself!]

Travelling internationally is no small feat, especially when you’re talking about the financial aspects. Whether you’re travelling for work for a lengthy period of time and staying in another country as an expatriate, or looking to move abroad permanently, there’s a good chance that the move may leave you short on cash at one point or another. If you find yourself short on money after your arrival, there is generally a choice of options available that may work for you.

A personal loan is likely the best option for you, especially if you’re trying to fund an international move. For example, let’s say you’re travelling to Jordan. Do some research and find out about loans available and the requirements. Some questions to ask yourself are “What are all of the expenses I expect to come across?” and “How do bank loans in Jordan differ from those I’ve typically become accustomed to?”

It’s always best to check out all your options and compare. For a personal loan in Jordan, HSBC offers competitive interest rates, high loan amounts (if necessary), and they also offer you the chance to defer your monthly payment instalments up to two times in a 12 month period. It may be somewhat of a rigorous process, but it is likely necessary if you need help funding the initial move and any large, one-off expenses.

If you’re planning to move to Jordan permanently, then you’ll want to get all of your finances in order. First, make sure to pay off any debts you still owe in your home country. Moving abroad may cause the debt and the fees associated with it to increase due to currency fluctuations and making payments from international accounts, so bear this in mind. Next, look into opening up an international account in preparation for making your move. This will help make sure you have access to your money as soon as you land. After your arrival, if you still find yourself short on cash, check with the bank you opened your international account with. Find out what options they offer for personal loans. Ask about interest rates, repayment methods, and other fees you may encounter when applying for a loan.

As well as funding your accommodations and moving costs, you should also look into the transportation options you will have once you arrive. If you think you’ll require a car, look at the costs of purchase and the finance options you would have available to you as an expatriate. You may find you need proof of employment and (of course) identification—the former you may only be able to provide after you have started your new job, so look into the options beforehand.

Moving abroad can take a major toll on your finances, whether it’s a permanent or temporary situation, so it’s best to make sure you’re aware of all the options available to you beforehand so you don’t run in to any financial trouble.  It is also important to get your home items from A to B safely, for this many people use shipping companies like Sarah did when moving from Scotland to America.

It’s best to be overly prepared than not prepared enough!

Photo credit:  prayitno

Fashion trends I just don’t get

La luna le preguntó al cuervo.We all know I’m not exactly a trend follower. I’m all about having a simple, basic wardrobe I can update each season with a few new pieces to keep things fresh.

Sometimes those pieces are on point with current trends, sometimes they’re not…I tend to go for what I like, more than what the latest trends are. That said, there are plenty of times when I’m more than happy to jump into the latest thing. It all depends on the trend.

This season, I’m loving all the girly touches (floral details, retro bows and polka dots) and bright neon colors (you’d find it hard to believe with all the neutral clothes I own, but little pops of color like earrings are totally fun!).

On the other hand, there are plenty of trends this spring/summer that I just do not get. Here are some of the big ones:

Super-duper fancy nail art. As impressed as I am by people drawing elaborate flowers and branches and stripes on their nails, I can never get nail polish to last on my hands for longer than a day before it starts chipping. I could never invest so much time in creating mini masterpieces (or money paying someone else to do it) only to have my masterpiece destroyed the first time I try to open the cap on my toothpaste.

And don’t even get me started on gel nail polish. Just the ads in magazines, with the special heat lamps and whatever else, confuse me.

Ombre. I didn’t even know what this was until I’d heard enough people use the term on Facebook and Twitter to decide I needed to investigate. Here is what it is…basically just darker hair at the routes fading to lighter hair at the tips.

Am I being an airhead (my hair is only blonde), or has this not been a thing for a while now? With all the streaking, and highlighting, and color blocking, and everything else people do to their hair, has no one ever done this style before? I feel like it can’t be that new…

Hair feathers/chalk.  Unless you’re a 13 year-old or a pop singer, no. Just no.

Mini, snakeskin, and transparent purses. More than a few of my friends are sporting these, and I just don’t get them. First of all, while I don’t need a “mom bag” that can fit three days’ worth of emergency supplies, I would like to be able to fit more than a Chapstick and my keys into my bag. Second of all, whatever is in my bag is not pretty enough to be a fashion accessory itself, so no one needs to see my purse’s contents just because clear is “in.”

Third of all, snakeskin? I will never get snakeskin. I don’t like the look, I don’t like the feel (am I supposed to be Western?), and I just think they look too “old lady.” Give me my choice of nice, cheap bags (I love the pink one with the flower halfway down the page!), and I’m set.

What fashion trends do you love/hate? Can you defend any of the above?

 

~Heart,

Em

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photo credit:  Monica Lara

Are you PF savvy but not math-minded? Then these are for you…

CalculatorI have a confession to make: while I’m a PF nut, I’m not a big numbers gal.

I hate math, actually.

So while I love the idea of things like comparing loans for the best terms or crunching our budget so we can put aside for certain savings goals…and while I know these things are necessary…when it comes down to actually doing the math, most of the time I give it to The Hubby. I just don’t have the interest or the skill to do it myself (and know I’m doing it right).

Which is why I was super-excited when I found out that The Financial Mentor has a whole page of 80 of the best financial planning calculators. I actually called The Hubby in to take a look at it. I can’t tell if he was smiling because he knew he’d have to do less number work for me, or because he thought it was cute how excited I was getting over calculators. J

Whatever math you need help with, these calculators have you covered. You can browse by category (retirement, loans, debt payoff, etc.) or by specific questions like “How long until I pay off my credit card using various strategies?” or “How long until I reach my savings goal given the amount I’m currently saving each month?”

I see myself using these in so many different situations. I’ve actually gotten some ideas for new comparisons I can run for our financial planning, just by browsing the questions. I think these are the coolest PF tool I’ve come across since Mint.

Are you PF savvy but not math savvy like me? How do you handle the numbers games?

 

~Heart,

Em

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photo credit:  401(K) 2013 by 401kcalculator.org

Blog Roundup (5-3-13)

I always love sharing my favorite blogs with people, so each week I’ll be giving you guys a roundup of the posts I’ve really enjoyed reading.

If you like them, make sure to subscribe and follow these great bloggers on Twitter and Facebook to share the love!

~Heart,

Em

  • Some of Modest Money’s 6 Buying Behaviors to Break Now are things you may already know, but some may not be. (Have you heard of spaving? Because you might be doing it!)
  • Cool free stuff: Take Our Stuff is giving away a retro 8-track player with 8-track collection for those of you who love music and/or vintage things, while Take Our Gift Cards is giving away a $100 Safeway card. (We don’t have one in our area, but if we did, you’d better believe I’d be entering for it!)

Are there any great posts you came across recently? Share them with us in the comments!